Justice: Hiding in Translation

Justice: Hiding in Translation

When I first started studying what the Bible said about justice topics, I thought I knew exactly how to find them: search for the word “justice.” But there’s a problem with looking for justice in the New Testament. If you type “justice” into a Bible word search engine, it doesn’t appear much. “Justice” appears only 11 times in the ESV translation, 9 times in the NASB, and 8 times in the NKJV. For those translations, “justice” shows up more in the book of Isaiah—around three times more, in fact—than in the entire New Testament.

Why can't I "see" justice in the New Testament?

Why can't I "see" justice in the New Testament?

I’m starting a new blog series on Justice in the New Testament because I want to get beyond the surface “Is justice in the Bible?” conversations. It seems like because justice is being re-discovered in American Evangelical churches, the only teaching we get is the “Justice 101: Don’t freak out, yes social justice is a Christian thing, too” sermons. When we are only asking whether justice is even in there, we miss out on so much. Specifically, I think Evangelicals are confused about how social justice/justice and righteousness fit into the New Testament.

Justice and Righteousness: Central, Essential and Foundational to the Kingdom of God

Justice and Righteousness: Central, Essential and Foundational to the Kingdom of God

When I first started studying what the Bible said about justice topics, I thought I knew exactly how to find them: search for the word “justice.” But there’s a problem with looking for justice in the New Testament. If you type “justice” into a Bible word search engine, it doesn’t appear much. “Justice” appears only 11 times in the ESV translation, 9 times in the NASB, and 8 times in the NKJV.

It’s hard to see that the New Testament values justice when it seems almost silent on the subject.


Western-ish-Flavored Views of Justice Versus Hebrew

Western-ish-Flavored Views of Justice Versus Hebrew

Part of the challenge of learning about biblical justice is that our Western-ish views of justice are so different from Hebraic views from the time the Bible was originally written in. When an American Christian hears about justice, the images that we think of probably things like police officers, punishment, and courtrooms (and maybe a great TV drama about all those things). Unfortunately, that can make us reject doing justice now because we think of it through our Western-ish lenses. If God were to love our Western-flavored justice, then that would make Him a law-obsessed, punishment-loving judge. That is so far from what we know about God from the New Testament, so therefore we reject doing justice as Christians out of a genuine desire to reflect the Bible. But that is not at all the right image of a justice-loving God, or how we as Christians should do biblical justice. 


Love Via Socks

Love Via Socks

I saw him standing on the corner of the narrow downtown San Diego streets from the passenger seat of my friend's enormous white pickup truck. Something about his tired-looking face stood out to me. Immediately, I felt like I needed to go offer him socks and a sandwich. A few Saturdays each month, my friend and I would bring food and socks and hand them out as we hung out with some homeless people known to live in the area.

But the man didn't really look homeless, so I almost talked myself out of it.  Wouldn't he be offended if a random stranger offered him a homemade peanut butter and jelly sandwich and generic white socks?  

Exciting, Happy, Delightful Justice

Exciting, Happy, Delightful Justice

Do a quick check. If you got the news that God’s justice was coming, how would you feel? Confused? Scared? Nothing? The emotional response we see in the Bible makes a clear picture: God's justice and righteousness are so awesome that it makes everyone and everything everywhere ecstatic. This is an important lesson for us. Being shaped by God's own heart for justice and righteousness, and getting a biblical understanding for that they are, means that our reaction to justice and righteousness should include excitement, happiness, and delight.  

God's Grief

God's Grief

A question that stuck with me when I first stared reading about justice in the Bible was: Why does God take justice and injustice so seriously? Is He like a law-obsessed ruler sitting on His far away throne, enjoying throwing lightening bolts at particularly sinful people? That fit the picture I had of Him when I was growing up. But it didn't explain His passion for justice I saw in the Bible, one that seemed profoundly tied to people and relationships. 

The Walnuts & Rice of your Budget

The Walnuts & Rice of your Budget

"Economic justice" always sounded like an intimidating phrase to me. In the Old Testament “economic justice” parts, most everything that’s described feels far away from my world. Sweet, I'm not crushing widows or withholding wages from my fieldworkers, that must mean I'm not being economically unjust. Economic justice was something for governments to worry about, so I was good. But that perspective made me miss some key Biblical truths.

My Dad's love

My Dad's love

Let's take a break from theology-ish topics to meet someone important, my dad. 

Doors make him pretty happy. Born in a long line of inventive engineer types that loved working with their hands, my dad was raised tinkering in his dad's locksmith shop. Now he is one of the very best in the world at a very random, obscure specialty: Electrified door hardware. Yep, there are people like him in this world that are obsessed with door parts so you don't have to. And my dad happens to enjoy it immensely.

Injustice will find a voice

Injustice will find a voice

The Old Testament has some pretty hard-core, intense things to say about injustice committed by God's chosen people. But I had personally never heard anything about "economic injustice" in the New Testament, at the time when God's plan for redemption came through a Jesus and His heaven-anchored Kingdom. Is economic injustice still condemned in the New Testament? I personally think the best answer is to look at the topic of money, because Old Testament and New, God is surprisingly consistent about the principles behind using money. 

The Love Justice Challenge

The Love Justice Challenge

God loves justice and righteousness. Living a life full of justice and righteousness won’t take away from “more important” spiritual priorities. Justice and righteousness are God’s priority, so we can reflect that through our lives. I get it. Justice/social justice can feel too confusing to understand or too political or too scary to explore. So I am going to leave you with a simple challenge: Love justice and righteousness. That’s the message. There are three simple steps to walking this out.